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Standing tall for imaging interoperability at RSNA

Posted by Matthew Michela | 12.15.2016

The genus Sequoia represents some of the largest trees in the world, including our own country’s famed California redwoods. In healthcare, the Sequoia Project represents a group of health IT vendors, large healthcare networks and other stakeholders who recognize the essential nature of imaging accessibility for patient care and safety and support the creation of interoperable national networks.

At the Radiological Society of North America’s 2016 show late last month, lifeIMAGE was recognized as a first vendor  to successfully complete the RSNA Image Share Validation program, which rigorously tests the compliance of vendors’ systems to accurately and efficiently exchange medical images.

Launched in 2016, the validation program encourages the adoption of image-sharing capabilities by imaging vendors and radiology sites, expanding access to medical images and reports whenever and wherever they are needed. All imaging vendors are invited to apply.

From X-rays to mammograms, medical imaging is a critical component of patient care today. CDs as a means to exchange exams were a historical improvement to film, but it is time to move past the expense and inefficiency of physical recording media to the modern and efficient mechanism of web-based exchange. Safe, secure internet-based image sharing benefits diagnosing and treating physicians, radiologists, institutions and, most importantly, the patient.  

Earning the RSNA Image Share Validation seal demonstrate an organizational commitment to improve access to imaging records, enabling better-informed decisions about patient care, improving patient safety, reducing operational costs and supporting an improved patient experience.

lifeIMAGE is honored to have achieved his distinction and to help lead, in both words and action, the imaging interoperability revolution. We look forward to the day when interoperability initiatives realize full maturity and every U.S. patient’s health data will be accessible at the right place, at the right time, for the right care givers. Until then, we will continue to work toward that ultimate goal.